Event photography by Rico

These are digital photos from my work as a portrait and event photographer. 

Analog MTL 2017

Exposition de photo analogique organisée par Aye Mag — Analog photography exhibition organized by Aye Mag — Montreal, 2017

Plateaupolis

Le Plateau Mont-Royal is an actual geological plateau that was formed 125 million years ago by the volcanic activities of the Mount Royal. Le Plateau begins with the steep Sherbrooke slope (cyclists beware), sits on the right of the mountain, and ends north and east with the railroad tracks.

This Montreal arrondissement affectionately known as La République du Plateau was built in the 1900s as a working-class neighborhood, and has over the years become a much fabled area. Unlevel floors and leaking windows notwithstanding, le Plateau stands today as cultural stronghold, retaining most of its small town spirit centered around Mont-Royal avenue.

Read more “Plateaupolis”

Portraits, not in landscape

Here are some more street portraits from “Portraits in a City”.

These didn’t make it to the front page as they did’t fit the wider landscape format of the slideshow.

iPhoneography happens

Sometimes the best camera is the one you can pull out and shoot in less than ten seconds.

Des fois, le meilleur appareil photo est celui qu’on peut sortir et déclencher en moins de dix secondes.

Cuba, Another Revolución

Cuba, Another Revolución
Photo by Sam Hayden

Cuba, Another Revolution” is a photography project ​that aims at documenting the historic changes that are currently underway on the island of Cuba.

The short pitch could be: “When will McDonalds open their first restaurant in Cuba? I want to be there.” Of course, it might take years before we see this specific event happen, but the mighty American giant already has its foot in the door. Another cuban revolución is happening at this very moment.

I’m very much interested in witnessing and telling about how these tremendous changes will affect the proud and well-educated people of Cuba. After all, this is one of the last socialist countries in the world, standing only a few miles off of the US coast. The events are — obviously — historic; they will shake the Cuban society right down to its deep-seated revolutionary roots.

I’m interested in telling that story from every cuban’s perspective: government officials, doctors, cigar shop managers, and the old man who plays chess in the corner café. What do they stand to lose, and are they prepared to fight to preserve it?